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Can Heart Disease Be Prevented and Reversed?

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Articles Archive - Page 13

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A Rhythm That Can Be Deadly For Elderly!
For people with AF, blood flow within the atria slows down and might cause blood clots to form. The blood clots could break into pieces and travel to the brain and block the blood flow hence causing a stroke or transient ischemic attack. Should the blood clots flow in a limb or another organ, it could also cause damage, though this is relatively less common.

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Angry Outbursts Might Lead To Higher Heart Attack Risk!
Researchers from Harvard Medical School in Boston in the United States reported that there is transiently higher risk of having a heart attack following an outburst of anger after analyzing data from a group of 3,886 patients who were part of a study between 1989 and 1996.

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Are All Sweeteners The Same?
Sweeteners are used for a number of reasons. For instance, they can help in weight loss, dental care, and diabetes mellitus. Sometimes, food manufacturers use them to enhance the flavor and texture of their products with lower cost and longer shelf life. But, not all sweeteners are the same.

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Are Eggs Harmful For The Heart?
Eggs contain phosphatidylcholine (lecithin), too. Study had shown that dietary phosphatidylcholine is digested by bacteria in the gut and is eventually converted into a compound called TMAO, which is linked to increased heart disease. So, how many eggs can people consume without raising the heart disease risk?

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Are Sugary Drinks Most Blamed For Causing Obesity?
There are so many factors that could lead to overweight or even obesity. These include genes, sedentary lifestyle, unhealthy diet, lack of sleep, quit smoking, pregnancy, certain medications such as antidepressants and steroids. But, what is the most to blame for the obesity epidemic in the United States? The debate has been going on for quite some time.

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Belly Fat Could Shorten Life Of Thin Heart Disease Patients!
On January 28, 2013, researchers from Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota reported online in the ‘Journal of the American College of Cardiology’ that waist size might better predict risk of early death for people with heart disease than overall weight.

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Can Hard-To-Treat Hypertension Be Tackled?
Only about half of the hypertensive patients have their blood pressure under control, and most of them require multiple drugs for treatment. There is some 10 percent patients have resistant hypertension, meaning…

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Can Prolonged CPR Save More Cardiac Arrest Patients?
A general belief is that prolonged resuscitation for hospitalized patients is usually useless since even if patients do survive, they often suffer permanent neurological damage. But in a paper published on September 5, 2012 in medical journal ‘Lancet’, researchers from University of Michigan reported…

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Can Smoking Ban Reduce Heart Attack Risk?
The smoke-free laws can quickly and dramatically reduce the number of hospitalizations arising from heart attacks, strokes and respiratory diseases like asthma and emphysema. This was what the researchers from the Center for Tobacco Control Research and Education at the University of California-San Francisco had found.

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Can Vitamin D Prevent Hypertension?
During the annual conference of the European Society of Human Genetics (ESHG) held on June 11, 2013, researchers from University of London announced that low levels of Vitamin D could be a major cause of hypertension.

 
 
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Different Kinds of Heart Stents
Angioplasty helps improve blood supply to the heart muscle by widening narrowed or obstructed arteries. Frequently though not necessarily, a small tube called stent is inserted during the procedure to ensure the vessel remains open.

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Does Higher BMI Benefit Heart Disease Patients?
Many studies have, however, shown that obese patients with heart disease have better outcomes than those who are non-obese. There were also many evidences suggesting survival benefit in overweight or moderately obese patients with chronic disease like heart disease. Such finding has been termed as ‘obesity paradox’…

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Grapes And Heart Disease Prevention
Consuming moderate amount of red wine, which is made from dark-colored (black) grape varieties, has long been thought of helping prevent heart disease by raising levels of good cholesterol and protecting against artery damage. But would eating whole grapes in their original form offer the same effect?

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How Is Air Pollution Linked To Cardiovascular Disease?
While acute exposure to air pollution has been linked to myocardial infarction (heart attack), its effect on heart failure is uncertain. In a recent study conducted by researchers from University of Edinburgh in Scotland, short-term surge in air pollution particles or other gas pollutants in the air was found to raise the risk of heart failure.

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How Much Do You Know About Heart Attack?
New studies show that a person having no blockage in the heart arteries or have no risk factors for heart disease can still get a heart attack if there is an imbalance between oxygen supply and demand to the heart. According to the Third Universal Definition of myocardial infarction released in 2012…

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How Should Obesity Be Measured?
It appears that researchers from the Pennington Biomedical Research Center in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, USA might not think that measurement of BMI and weight alone could help tackle the issue of obesity.

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Hypertension and The Elderly
76.4 million American adults have been diagnosed with hypertension or more commonly known as high blood pressure (HBP). Being fairly common for the elderly, HBP has now been also diagnosed among an increasing number of youngsters.

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Is There Link Between Unemployment And Heart Attack?
A recent research had even linked unemployment to heart attack. In a paper published on December 10, 2012 in ‘Archives of Internal Medicine’, researchers from Duke University reported that people who were unemployed, had a history of unemployment, and those who had short periods of job loss were all at a higher risk for acute myocardial infarction (or heart attack).

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Link Between Chemical Exposure And Childhood Obesity
Unhealthy diet and sedentary lifestyle are recognized to be the biggest culprits responsible for childhood obesity epidemic, but there is a growing body of research suggested that environmental chemicals might play a role in childhood obesity.

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Looking Old Could Be Another Predictor For Heart Disease!
Researchers from the University of Copenhagen in Denmark reported that people who look older, for instance, with hair loss and fatty deposits around the eyes, have a higher risk of getting heart disease than those of the same age who look younger.

 
 
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Painkillers Can Harm Heart Attack Patients!
Excessive use of NSAIDs can, however, lead to ulcer perforation, upper gastrointestinal bleeding, and even death. The safety of NSAIDs for people with heart disease has also been questioned, with the exception of aspirin.

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Regulate Irregular Heartbeat Without Medications!
For patients who cannot tolerate, or do not want to take medications, or medications cannot control their symptoms to regulate their severe irregular heartbeat, there is an improved minimally invasive procedure that can help them control heart rhythm and rate.

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Should Big Sugary Drink Be Banned?
According to a recent survey conducted by Health Department, if a person drinks a bottle of 470ml bottle soda rather than 590ml, he or she could save 14,600 calories a year. Such amount of calories can add about 4 pounds (1.8 kilos) of fat. An average-size woman would need to walk about 550 km just to burn off the extra calories.

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Technology Spending Cause Obesity?
While technologies have no doubt improved living standards and supported economic growth, they are also responsible for the obesity epidemic that the world is facing now. According to a report published in August 2012 by Milken Institute, there is a 1.4 percent rise in obesity rate for every 10 percent increase in spending on information and communications technology.

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Things That Can Affect Blood Pressure
During the 28th Annual Scientific Meeting of the American Society of Hypertension (ASH) held between May 15 and 18, 2013, scientists further suggested that mobile phone calls might also cause a rise in blood pressure. It was also reported in the meeting that yoga might lower hypertension...

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What Complications Can Diabetes Bring?
When glucose does not go into the cells and builds up in the blood, it can lead to many complications including kidney disease, heart disease, hypertension (high blood pressure), stroke, eye disease and skin problems.

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What If Teens Are Not Having Enough Sleep?
Having inadequate sleep is not just a problem for adults. It happens to children and youngsters as well. A study reported that teens that do not sleep enough are more likely to have heart disease later in their life.

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Why Implantable Medical Devices Can Be Deadly?
Being released in 2012 by the Government Accountability Office (GAO), a non-partisan agency that works for Congress, the report suggested that the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) that approves and regulates such devices to set guidelines for manufacturers to help combat the threat of hacking.

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Why Measuring Blood Pressure Is Important For Elderly?
One elevated blood pressure reading does not imply that hypertension does exist, especially for the elderly. It is necessary to record blood pressures on multiple occasions at rest before a diagnosis of hypertension can be confirmed.

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You Can Still Get Heart Disease Even If You Are Healthy!
The overall lifetime risk in men and women for cardiovascular disease (CVD) exceeded 55 percent, and the risk was more than 30 percent for those who had optimal risk factor profile (normal blood pressure and cholesterol, did not smoke and did not have diabetes), as reported by researchers from…

 

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